The Role That Water And Hydration Play In Addiction And Recovery

Water is essential for the body to function. The human body is made up of 65% water, which is needed for various processes and reactions such as circulation, metabolism, body temperature and waste removal. If the body doesn’t have enough water, these physiological processes can be impaired.

The brain and heart are composed of 73% water, the lungs are about 83% water, the skin contains 64% water, muscles and kidneys are 79% and even your bones are made up of 31% water! You can now see why it’s so important to keep yourself hydrated if you want your body and mind to function optimally and as healthily as possible.

Reading this article will give you top tips and tricks to improve your fluid intake, recognise the signs of dehydration, over hydration and much, much more!

Drug Use Isn’t Just Bad For Humans – It’s Impacting Animals And Marine Life Too

A new study has shed light on how drugs taken by humans can affect fish. The study showed that brown trout exposed to methamphetamine in their water changed their behaviour, brain function and had long term effects upon their behaviour and natural processes.

Around 269 million people worldwide use drugs each year, and the byproducts end up in our sewers. Sewage treatment plants don’t routinely filter out drugs. One study estimates it’d cost over £36 million to upgrade wastewater treatment plants to remove these chemicals in England and Wales alone.

In a recent study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, researchers in the Czech Republic investigated how methamphetamine – a stimulant with a growing number of users worldwide – might be affecting wild brown trout.

They examined whether concentrations of methamphetamine and one of its byproducts, amphetamine, which were estimated from other studies that have measured illicit drug concentrations in waterways, could be detected in the brains of brown trout. They also looked at whether these concentrations were enough to cause the animals to become addicted.

To find out what the full results of this study show, how it may affect you and what you can do to help can all be found inside our article!

Don’t Go Chasing Waterfalls – Seeing Your Addiction And Recovery Journey From A Different Perspective

Using rivers and waterfalls as analogies for addiction and recovery have a lot more in common than you may realise at first, especially helping us to see those “Aha” moments.

The “aha’s” come when we realise that we don’t tend to blame people for drowning or for just treading water. We understand that sometimes people jump in over their heads, get caught in the current or get swept away by forces stronger than themselves.

If we find ourselves in this swiftly moving river, we recognise that we need more than human willpower to get back out. Much more. This is where we can find some compassion, which can be a life raft we offer to ourselves and others who are in recovery.

Addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease and its rapids are fast and deep. Some of us dive in and never make it back to the surface. Others fight the current for many years. Most of us need help to make our way to shore and keep from falling in again. It takes a lot of practice to become a strong swimmer.

You can find helpful exercises and information to benefit you, no matter whether you’re still actively using or drinking, in recovery already or wish to help a friend or loved one who’s afflicted by an addiction.